George Washington National Forest – Signal Knob Part 3

Continued from Part 2

The view from Signal Knob is nice, but would be much better if it wasn’t interrupted by this pole…

Signal Knob

While we were up there we saw one poisonous snake hiding near the TV tower. As with other places you can hike in Virginia, watch out where you step!

The fire road down from Signal Knob summit, which is actually just a continuation of the Massanutten National Recreation Trail, is a great place to spot a variety of wildflowers and plant life. Unfortunately, by the time that we got there in early October, most of the plants were already fading. However, we still were able to see a few.

Frost Aster

Frost Aster

Frost Aster

Frost Aster, White Heath Aster, Hairy White Oldfield Aster, or Symphyotrichum pilosum, is a member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) and blooms September to October. A native plant, it grows mostly throughout eastern and central North America.

Panicled Aster

Panicled Aster

The Panicled Aster, or Aster simplex, is a member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) and blooms August to October. A native flower, it grows throughout North America, except in the far north. It enjoys damp thickets, meadows, and shorelines. It grows in colonies, spreading by rhizomes — underground stems.

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1.3 miles from Signal Knob summit you turn left onto Tuscarora Trail. There is a campground close to the turnoff point. Nearby we spotted some little orange mushrooms.

Chanterelle Waxy Cap

Chanterelle Waxy Cap

The Chanterelle Waxy Cap, or Hygrocybe cantharellus, is a member of the Waxcap or Waxy Cap family (Hygrophoraceae) and can be found July to October. It grows in woodlands, in fields, and on roadsides. They exist in both North America and Europe.

Continue to Part 4

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