George Washington National Forest: Buzzard Rock Part 1

Buzzard Rock has two hikes – a short one that comes in from the North, and a longer one of 7 miles from Elizabeth Furnace Parking lot. We went on the longer Buzzard Rock hike. We’ve been to this one before and enjoyed it.

There are a couple places you can find the Tuscarora/Massanutten Trail. One is off in the bushes near the upper parking lot, the other is next to the river. Almost every time we come here we see someone fishing.

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Around the parking lot and picnic area, as well as at the beginning of the trail, we found many Asters.

Calico Aster

Calico Aster

Calico Aster, or Aster lateriflorus, is a member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) and blooms August to October. A native wildflower, it grows throughout eastern and central North America. It favors fields and thickets. The name comes from the fact that the disk flowers in the center are first yellow and later turn purplish red, so that the flowers on one plant or even a single head can include both colors at the same time.

Frost Aster

Frost Aster

Frost Aster

Frost Aster, White Heath Aster, Hairy White Oldfield Aster, or Symphyotrichum pilosum, is a member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) and blooms September to October. A native plant, it grows mostly throughout eastern and central North America.

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Heart-leaved Aster

The Heart-leaved Aster, Broad-leaved Aster, Common Blue Wood Aster, Heartleaf Aster, or Aster cordifolius, is a member of the Aster family (Asteraceae) and blooms August to October. It blooms in earlier months down in the south. A native plant, it grows throughout eastern and central North America.

Continue to Part 2

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